The Hard Suspension: 30 Days - No Driving.

While going through this process, you’re going to get a lot of mail - the worst is the big imposing letter from the DMV that reads “ORDER OF SUSPENSION” across the top. The DMV writes in all caps, so it just looks intimidating.

When you lose your DMV hearing your license is suspended automatically for four months. After 30 days you can apply for a restricted license that will allow you to drive either to limited places (Work, School, DUI program), with an Ignition Interlock Device (IID), or both. I got the interlock restriction, but recently spoke to a woman in my DUI class that got the travel restriction and no interlock. If you have to get a DUI get one in Orange County, not LA County, I guess.

So, if you go for the restricted program you get additional time (just one month) on your suspension (unless your conviction gives you a 6 month suspension, in which case it doesn’t), but you have the ability to drive your car in many conditions, which most people we see as worth it, so you really only have to give up driving for 30 days.

When I served my 30 days of driving, it was the longest period I had ever gone without driving a car since getting my license. I live in LA, getting around without a car is unthinkable!

Fortunately, it wasn’t as bad as I thought.

I got lucky and was working out of an office about two and a half miles away from me, so my commute to work involved me getting up a bit earlier (truly the hardest part) and biking at a quick rate, but one that wouldn’t get me very sweaty. This took some trial and error. I recognize that most aren’t so lucky, and that biking what was a 45 minute ride three cities away just isn’t practical. The most difficult part of this suspension for some people isn’t the mobility, but the thought of having to give their boss an excuse as to why they can’t drive into work. Car problems, family issues, and other excuses can work out. You will just have to gauge the situation for yourself. If you have an office that allows you to telecommute, by all means do that. If not, have a family member or trusted friend drive you. Or Uber.

Do I really gotta do this?

Yes. Yes you do. Yes. Yes. Yes.

Granted, there was a certain amount of people in my DUI program that were driving on a suspended license, I very much cannot recommend it. Driving on a suspended license is a serious charge, and the stiffest penalties are for when you drive on a suspended license because of a DUI. Penalties: Possible 1 year complete “hard” suspension, 3 years probation, $2000 fine, 10 days in County Jail, and 3 years of the IID.
That’s so much worse than the suspension ahead of you. Don’t do it. Don’t do it.

Sure, maybe you won’t get caught. Maybe you didn’t fix that taillight that got you pulled over the first time (crazy how many people get pulled over something and don’t immediately high-tail it over to the nearest AutoZone or mechanic to get it fixed). Maybe you’re still speeding, or driving recklessly. If you get caught drinking and driving while driving on a suspended license because of a DUI you are about to get really fucked over. That’s just dumb. If you’re going to drive on the suspended license, at least drive sober.
30 days is nothing. Besides, you don’t need that creeping fear when you’re driving on a suspended license and a cop pulls up behind you. It’s worth it to not drive just to avoid that feeling.

How To Get Around

I found the suspension gave me a great excuse to get the bike tuned up and try to get back into bicycle shape… which the first ride proved, had been far too long. Biking is fun to get around, especially once you figure out which side streets you can ride on easily and figure out where the big hills are. You get some exercise, which you never get in a car. You can still listen to your music on your phone, or podcasts, or whatever, just be sure to check into your local laws about headphones as some places are starting to crack down on that sort of thing. Just one bit of important information:
You can absolutely get a DUI while riding a bicycle.

Not going to lie, I take my bike to the bar and ride it back after a few. It’s generally not an issue, I use side streets and obey all traffic laws.
All traffic laws for cars apply to bicycles as well. Red lights, bike lights, etc. It’s incredibly rare for somebody to get a DUI while on a bicycle, and the general consensus is that you have to be a real dickhead to a cop or other person to get one, but - you are on probation, and that’s looked down on. So be careful and know you’re taking a risk if you continue to drink while taking the bike around. Be respectful to cars, be respectful to traffic laws, and you should be fine.

Additionally, I familiarized myself with Los Angeles’ subway system, which most people who live here don’t even realize we have one. It’s underused, efficient, and a pretty pleasant experience. Bring your headphones, bring a book, and you’re good. It’s kind of amazing to be able to change time you would spend driving into catching up on a book, or getting some work done. Makes you think about the time lost to actual driving. The difficult part about the subway is that it’s very limited in where it goes - some areas are just completely not served, and that it’s strict on it’s timetable - so many times I’ve been rushing down the stairs to hear the train leave the station and been stuck for some time. Still, it gets you to a lot of places you want to go, so I can’t knock it.

Then there’s the bus. The bus… is the bus. It has weirdos, and loose timetables, and you’re never sure if it’s coming late or left early… It’s a hassle. But it gets you around, and once you get the hang of it, it’s not so bad. The big advantage is that it gets almost everywhere, and can be used with the subway to cut travel times down drastically. The bus is an underrated player in the transportation game.

Finally, there’s Uber and Lyft. The most priciest options, but also the nicest. You make the request and before too long somebody comes by in their car, picks you up and takes you to your destination. Sometimes the driver can be a little bit talky, but otherwise it’s a pretty good service. Cheaper than a cab (who won’t come get you when you want it to and is an incredibly unpleasant experience), and super convenient. It’s best to get familiar with these two for when you do have your license back and still want to drink. Additionally you can get a free ride for each of these with a code for one free ride on each of these services (you can use one to your destination and the other back for a free round trip and a comparison between the two.)

Additionally, each of these services have a carpool option, that picks up somebody along the way and going in roughly the same direction. Depending on how much you like random situations, this can be good or bad. I know people who have made very close friends from this, and even one couple that met through this. I do it because it’s cheaper.

Uber and Lyft are super popular, leaving some people to ditch their cars completely and solely rely on them to get around. Even a small car payment means a lot of rides on the service, but I’m not sure I’m ready for that yet. Uber wants to take their technology to get a full fleet of driverless cars, and people would just get rides that way and replace personal car ownership. That’s a really interesting vision of the future, one I kind of hope comes - because if I never have to drive again, I can never pick up another DUI.

The Experience

Like I said, overall the experience wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be. I was lucky enough to be able to bike in to work, a lot of the places I wanted to go were off the subway or bus lines and there were stops pretty near my place. Just because I was starting to get strapped for cash, I avoided using Uber and Lyft, but ended up using them a fair amount. They came in super handy when I’d be across town late at night and the bus wouldn’t be around for another 2 hours.

It’s much more doable than I thought it’d be. The biggest problem is getting groceries, grabbing lunch for yourself on the weekends, all the quick runs. If it’s a big thing, like joining your crew for a big hangout then you can figure out when you need to leave to take the train, or grab an uber or whatever, but when the nearest laundromat is 3/4 of a mile away, things begin to get tricky.

That said, uber drivers are very understanding.

It’s also a nice excuse to say no. Friends would want me to come out to something they were doing, usually I’d go even though I didn’t want to - now, because of this, I could say no, give them some excuse (I wasn’t telling everybody about this) and enjoy my time to myself. Watch a movie on Netflix, catch up on all those little side projects I’d been meaning to do. It gave me a nice excuse to work on myself, and projects I wanted to do, instead of being pulled every different direction like usual.

One worry people have is that if you can’t drive, that people will find out. I went out less than I normally would, but still went out, biking, catching an
uber, etc. and nobody was ever the wiser.

The Hitch

There’s just one tiny little hitch to the process - You’re
eligible to apply for your restricted license after 30 days. That doesn’t mean you’ll just automatically get it after 30 days. If you’re getting the interlock device, as I have, you have to get it installed before you can get the license, and you have to get it installed on the installer’s schedule. But you can’t make an appointment with the installer until you’re eligible, which means you can’t get the appointment until you’ve served the 30 days. It’s bureaucracy at it’s worst. I only had an extra 4 days without the car, but they served to be the four days I could’ve used my car the most.

However, it did give me a chance to think about driving my car again - I ended up illegally driving it over to a nearby service station and getting a few things taken care of - namely an oil change that was due, and brake pads that would’ve been needed sometime during my months with the interlock. I figured it was better to get them taken care of now, than when the device was on. Despite the illegal drive, I feel this was the right thing to do. It was the
only time I drove illegally.

In the end

30 Days seems like a lot, but it will go by
much quicker than you think it will. I started counting every day. Day 1. Day 2. Day 3. I lost track before I even hit 10.

This, like most of your punishments, will quickly become just a memory. Oh yeah, I did that.